What Is the Statute of Limitations for a Wrongful Termination Lawsuit?

While employers are allowed to fire most workers in New Jersey or Pennsylvania at any time and for nearly any reason or no reason at all, there are some exceptions to this rule. Employers cannot terminate workers for discriminatory reasons based on their protected statuses. They also cannot fire workers to retaliate against them for

The Seventh Circuit holds that FedEx Delivery Drivers are employees, and not independent contractors, of FedEx.

The ruling from the Seventh Circuit has strong implications for drivers working across the United States who have been classified as “independent contractors” and forced to pay for fuel, lease payments, insurance, and other business expenses relating to their work. On July 8th, 2015 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit adopted the

Supreme Court Upholds Determination that Loan Officers Were Entitled to Overtime

Mortgage loan officers might be now entitled to a 40-hour work week and overtime pay, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Department of Labor acted within its authority when it reclassified loan officers as non-exempt employees who are eligible for overtime. The ruling stems from a 2010 decision by the Department of Labor to reclassify loan officers.

Employment Attorneys meet with EEOC to discuss National Origin Discrimination Concerns

An Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) conference highlighting employment discrimination due to national origin was held in Washington, D.C. on November 13, 2013.

Discrimination on the basis of national origin is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This protection can be broadly applied not only to discrimination resulting merely from a persons place of birth or ancestry. Also applicable would be discrimination on the basis of cultural or linguistic characteristic, such as accents and clothing. The law thus protects, for example, an Indian man’s right to wear a turban, or a Czech’s heavy accent.

New Jersey Voters Stand Behind Workers and Raise Minimum Wage

On November 4th New Jersey residents voted in favor of raising the state minimum wage to $8.25 an hour. Voters overwhelmingly supported the raise, which additionally amends the state Constitution to adjust the minimum wage in tandem with the rise of inflation.

The results of the public ballot will amend Article I of the New Jersey State Constitution. The amendment begins by stating its intentions rather triumphantly:

New Jersey Legislature Passes Two New Laws Designed at Reducing Employment Discrimination

New Jersey employees had reason to rejoice this summer, as the New Jersey legislature passed two pieces of legislation on August 27th that strengthens employee privacy and prohibit certain types of discrimination based on private matters.

Discrimination Lawsuit Charges Red Lobster Franchisee with Sexual Harassment

A Red Lobster Franchisee, GMRI, Inc., has been charged in a lawsuit alleging pervasive sexual harassment and discrimination at its Salisbury, MD location, in violation of federal law. The Philadelphia Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) district office in Pennsylvania is bringing the claim.   The EEOC is a federal agency charged with handling employment discrimination

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reaches settlement with Toys “R” Us in Employment Discrimination Lawsuit

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has reached a settlement with Toys “R” Us in an employment discrimination lawsuit. Toys “R” Us is one of the world’s largest retailers of toys and children’s products in the world, and has multiple retail locations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and all around the United States. The disability discrimination lawsuit filed at the Philadelphia EEOC district office against Toys “R” Us, Inc. has resulted in a $35,000 settlement and payment of significant equitable relief for employment discrimination. The settlement is one in a number of rising employment discrimination lawsuits settling in the EEOC district offices of New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

More than 5,000 Drivers Have Joined the CR England Class Action Lawsuit

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH: The class and collective action lawsuit filed against C.R. England earlier this year is becoming a major legal battle between the company’s current and former truck drivers and the company.  As of the writing of this article, more than 5,000 C.R. England drivers have filed Consent Forms to join the C.R. England Class Action Lawsuit (as of 11/9/2013).  The collective and class action lawsuit, which was filed in the United States District Court for the District of Utah earlier this year, was certified as a collective action in September of 2013.

Legislature Considering Bill to Amend the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination to Expand the Rights of Pregnant Employees

On September 30, 2013, New Jersey (NJ) Senate proposed legislation requiring employers to make reasonable accommodation available for pregnancy-related needs when requested by the employees with the advice of their physician. Currently, under the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (NJ LAD), there is no requirement that preferential leave be given to a pregnant employee, unless complications related to the pregnancy rise to the level of a disability under New Jersey discrimination law.