What To Do If You Are Facing Religious Discrimination In Pennsylvania

Religious freedom is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution and is the first one that is listed in the First Amendment. Religious liberty includes the right to practice a religion of your choice while enjoying all of the privileges and benefits of society. Religious discrimination is prohibited in multiple settings, including education, work, housing, public accommodations,

Richard Swartz, best employment benefits attorney

Richard Swartz has been named one of the best employment benefits attorney Richard Swartz, one of the partners at Swartz Swidler, LLC, has been named one of the South Jersey best employment benefits attorneys! For more information, please visit: https://sjmagazine.net/e-issue/2016/08/#page/64 Richard Swartz is an experienced attorney in the field of litigation. Since his first case

Employer must reasonably accommodate religious practices under Title VII regardless of actual knowledge of belief

On June 1st, The Supreme Court issued an opinion in the case Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. Abrecrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc; an employment discrimination lawsuit in which Abercrombie refused to hire Samantha Elauf, a practicing Muslim, because the headscarf that she wore pursuant to her religious obligations conflicted with Abercrombie’s employee dress policy. The

Employment Attorneys meet with EEOC to discuss National Origin Discrimination Concerns

An Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) conference highlighting employment discrimination due to national origin was held in Washington, D.C. on November 13, 2013.

Discrimination on the basis of national origin is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This protection can be broadly applied not only to discrimination resulting merely from a persons place of birth or ancestry. Also applicable would be discrimination on the basis of cultural or linguistic characteristic, such as accents and clothing. The law thus protects, for example, an Indian man’s right to wear a turban, or a Czech’s heavy accent.

Reports of Religious Discrimination Rising in New Jersey

Religious discrimination in the workplace continues to rise in New Jersey and around the country.  As the Wall Street Journal recently reported,  reports of employment-based religious-discrimination are sky rocketing.  The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has reported a surge of wide-ranging employee claims of religious discrimination as expressions of faith have grown more diverse. The EEOC defines religious-discrimination as “treating a person (applicant or employee) unfavorably because of his or her religious beliefs. The law protects not only people who belong to traditional, organized religious … but also others who have sincerely held religious, ethical or moral beliefs. Religious discrimination can also involve treating someone differently because that person is married to (or associated with) an individual of a particular religion or because of his or her connection with a religious organization or group.”